Skip to main content

Table 4 Motivational factors associated with specialty preference

From: Few gender differences in specialty preferences and motivational factors: a cross-sectional Swedish study on last-year medical students

   Women Men
   N = 214 N = 154
   OR p OR p
Surgical specialties Combining work with family 0.4 (0.3–0.6) .000 0.4 (0.3–0.7) .000
  Good salarya 1.9 (1.2–3.0) .004 0.8 (0.5–1.3) NS
  In line with technical skills 1.4 (1.0–1.9) .034 1.9 (1.2–3.0) .011
  Lots of direct patient contact 0.9 (0.6–1.3) NS 0.6 (0.4–0.9) .018
Non-surgical specialties Research opportunities 1.4 (1.0–1.9) .023 1.9 (1.3–2.9) .001
  Good salary 0.4 (0.2–0.6) .000 0.8 (0.5–1.3) NS
  Interesting content 2.4 (1.0–5.5) .048 1.7 (0.8–3.9) NS
Family medicine Lots of direct patient contact 3.7 (1.8–7.9) .001 2.9 (1.4–6.0) .005
  Career prospectsa 0.4 (0.2–0.7) .002 0.8 (0.4–1.5) NS
  Combining work with family 2.3 (1.3–4.2) .004 1.6 (0.9 –2.9) NS
  Good salary 1.9 (1.1–3.3) .018 1.7 (0.9–3.2) NS
  Interesting content 0.4 (0.2–0.9) .024 0.8 (0.4–1.9) NS
  In line with technical skills 0.6 (0.4–1.0) .045 0.7 (0.5–1.2) NS
  Research opportunities 0.8 (0.6–1.3) NS 0.6 (0.4–1.0) .031
Uncertain Combining work with family 2.1 (1.5–3.1) .000 1.8 (1.2–2.7) .005
  Lots of direct patient contact 0.6 (0.4–0.8) .003 1.0 (0.7–1.5) NS
  1. Note: Specialty preference (outcome) = modeling the probability of choosing it (not choosing it = ref.). Mediators = motivational factors (probability of choosing a specialty preference). OR = odds ratio (95% CI = confidence interval). Significance was set at p < .05. NS = not significant. p < .05 in bold. aSignificant interaction term with gender in separate analyses on each motivational factor.