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Table 1 Objectives, outcomes, and implementation of SBME in Thai medical schools

From: Simulation-based medical education in Thailand: a cross-sectional online national survey

Topic
Administrator data (N = 15)
Learning objective (n (%)) Overall For teaching For evaluation For research
  Psychomotor tasks 15 (100) 15 (100) 11 (73.3) 5 (33.3)
  Medical knowledge 14 (93.3) 14 (93.3) 13 (86.7) 4 (26.7)
  Patient care 14 (93.3) 14 (93.3) 13 (86.7) 4 (26.7)
  Communication skills 14 (93.3) 12 (80.0) 12 (80.0) 4 (26.7)
  Professionalism 12 (80.0) 10 (66.7) 10 (66.7) 4 (26.7)
  Decision making 12 (80.0) 11 (73.3) 10 (66.7) 3 (20.0)
  Team management 12 (80.0) 12 (80.0) 11 (73.3) 3 (20.0)
  Leadership 11 (73.3) 9 (60.0) 8 (53.3) 2 (13.3)
Instructor data (N = 154) a Pre-clinical year (1st-3rd year; N = 26) Clinical year (4th-6th year; N = 133)
The expected outcome of the SBME course (n (%))
 Improving knowledge 17 (65.4) 71 (53.4)
 Improving attitude 14 (53.8) 61 (45.9)
 Improving performance 21 (80.8) 106 (79.7)
 Improving practice 16 (61.5) 86 (64.7)
 Improving patient outcomes 10 (38.5) 43 (32.3)
Type of simulators (n (%))
 Part task trainer 21 (80.8) 98 (73.7)
 High fidelity mannequin 7 (26.9) 74 (55.6)
 Standardized patients 16 (61.5) 68 (51.1)
 Screen-based simulation 4 (15.4) 15 (11.3)
 Cadaver 4 (15.4) 6 (4.5)
Teaching characteristics (mean (SD))
 Teaching duration per course (hours) 2.7 (0.7) 3.3 (4.6)
 Preparation duration (hours) 4.5 (3.2) 3.0 (5.1)
 Courses per year (times) 2.8 (3.0) 6.7 (4.7)
 Students per class (person) 33.0 (22.7) 15.4 (9.1)
  1. aFive instructors taught both pre-clinical and clinical year medical students