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Table 5 Negative and positive elements of students’ and teachers’ feedback (question 21)

From: Script concordance test acceptability and utility for assessing medical students’ clinical reasoning: a user’s survey and an institutional prospective evaluation of students’ scores

  Students’ feedbacks N (%)
Positive points SCT are adapted to graduate medical students 9 (10%)
SCT are adapted to post-graduate medical students 7 (8%)
SCT are adapted to doctors for continuing medical education 4 (4.5%)
The principle of SCT is excellent 1 (1%)
SCT are discriminant 1 (1%)
Positive/Negative points SCT are interesting in theory but not in practice 21 (24%)
Negative points Too high variability between experts ‘responses 27 (30.5%)
SCT are too ambiguous, not clear enough 22 (24%)
SCT are not adapted to graduate medical students 13 (15%)
Inadequacy is felt between obtained scores and skills / knowledge 9 (10%)
insufficient students preparation 8 (7%)
SCT are useless 6 (6.5%)
SCT are confusing 4 (4.5%)
SCT are too subjective 4 (4.5%)
Frustrating because no possibility to justify one’s answer 3 (3.5%)
The principle of SCT is bad 3 (3.5%)
SCT are too difficult 3 (3.5%)
Inadequacy is felt between SCT experts answers and national referential about the subject 2 (2%)
Lack of detailed correction 1 (1%)
SCT are not discriminant 1 (1%)
  Teachers’ feedbacks N (%)
Positive points SCT are adapted to post-graduate medical students 1 (9%)
Positive/Negative points SCT need to be developed 1 (9%)
SCT are useful only once knowledge is acquired 1 (9%)
Negative points Difficult to write questions 3 (27%)
SCT are not satisfying 2 (18%)
Too high variability between experts ‘responses 1 (9%)
SCT are too ambiguous, not clear enough 1 (9%)
SCT are not adapted to graduate medical students 1 (9%)
Difficult to recruit a sufficient number of experts 1 (9%)
SCT are confusing 1 (9%)
SCT prevent students from good medical reasoning 1 (9%)
  1. Results are expressed in number of students and percentage of the responding students (n = 88) and teachers (n = 11)