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Table 7 Overall model predicting the likelihood of choosing primary care careers

From: Medical students’ attitudes towards and views of general practice careers in Singapore: a cross-sectional survey and qualitative analysis

Predictor Multivariable linear regression
p Raw estimate Standardized estimate 95% Lower limit 95% Upper limit VIF
Intercept .648 −.65     
Agea .538 .09 .03 −.20 .39 1.05
Genderb .530 −.13 −.03 −.53 .28 1.05
Practical considerations (own career) < .001 .91 .23 .56 1.27 1.14
Style of working (own career) <.001 .69 .19 .34 1.04 1.24
Career potential (own career) < .001 −1.48 −.31 −1.91 −1.04 1.11
Ambiguous attributes (primary care careers) < .001 1.11 .31 .74 1.49 1.42
Potential limitations (primary care careers) .828 .03 .01 −.27 .34 1.39
Potential strength (primary care careers) .043 .42 .09 .01 .83 1.11
Perceptions of GP/FM by groups in the medical community .197 .11 .07 −0.06 .29 1.60
Perceptions of GP/FM by groups outside the medical community .461 −.05 −.04 −0.19 .09 1.35
View of the future of primary care .905 .01 .01 −0.17 .19 1.30
  1. aAge was entered as a continuous variable
  2. bThere were nine participants who selected “prefer not to say” for gender. They were excluded in the analysis shown above. However, when included, the significance of all variables remained unchanged except for the gender variable. Those selecting “prefer not to say” had lower preference for primary care careers (Mprefer not to say = 2.44, compared to Mmale = 5.71, Mfemale = 5.83, on a scale of 0 to 10). The reference level for gender was male