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Table 2 Standard operating procedure for role coaching

From: Effectiveness of clinical scenario dramas to teach doctor-patient relationship and communication skills

Role coaching for ‘doctors’ Role coaching for ‘patients’
1. The ‘doctor’ reads the script independently
2. Ask the ‘doctor’ to give a brief description of the information obtained in the first-person narration
3. If necessary, help the ‘doctor’ review the relevant medical knowledge and the key points of communication skills.
4. Inform learning tasks
a) In the following exercise, your task is …
b) Your feedback is important for learning, and try to remember the successes and difficulties in completing the task
c) Notice: In role coaching, the patient will be asked not to embarrass the ‘doctor’ in the medical framework, but if your communication style does not satisfy him, he can express it in his own way
5. Help the ‘doctor’ get into character: “Dr. X, you are about to meet the patient. How are you feeling?”
1. The ‘patient’ reads the script independently
2. Ask the ‘patient’ to give a brief description of the information obtained in the first-person narration
3. According to the script, propose a hypothetical scenario “How would you react if the doctor said … “, promote students to deeply understand the feelings of the role. Similar medical or life experiences may help ‘patient’ get into the role.
4. Get out of the script: The script is just a frame of reference, you are the protagonist in the drill, you can make response according to your own personality and feelings at that time.”
5. Inform learning tasks:
a) Your feedback is important to learning. Try to keep in mind what makes you feel good or bad while the doctor is doing the job.
b) Don’t embarrass the doctor within the medical framework, but if his or her performance doesn’t satisfy you, you can express it in your own way.
6. Ask about feelings of the ‘patient’: “Mr. / Mrs. X, you are going to see the doctor. How are you feeling?”