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Table 3 Percentage and number (within brackets) of respondents agreeing (scoring >50) to the five gender attitude statements and scoring high (>250) on "importance-of-gender"-scale. P-values from comparison between specialty groups and between men and women. (S = surgical doctors, NS = non-surgical doctors, FP = family physicians.)

From: Gender awareness among physicians – the effect of specialty and gender. A study of teachers at a Swedish medical school

  All respondents Men Women  
Outcome variable Total S NS FP p1 Total S NS FP p1 Total S NS FP p1 p2
Statements:                 
1. The patient's gender is of importance in consultation. 69 (199) 55 (47) 74 (88) 80 (41) .002 66 (130) 51 (36) 71 (58) 81 (22) .007 76 (69) 69 (11) 81 (30) 79 (19) .601 .061
2. My own gender is of importance in consultation. 68 (196) 48 (41) 75 (88) 84 (43) <.001 62 (123) 41 (28) 69 (57) 89 (24) <.001 81 (73) 76 (13) 86 (31) 79 (19) .745 .002
3. The gender of the medical student is of importance in clinical tutoring. 53 (153) 43 (37) 55 (65) 71 (36) .007 47 (92) 38 (26) 52 (43) 59 (16) .084 68 (61) 65 (11) 61 (22) 83 (20) .175 .001
4. My own gender is of importance in clinical tutoring. 50 (142) 42 (36) 52 (60) 67 (34) .023 42 (80) 37 (25) 45 (36) 52 (14) .335 70 (62) 65 (11) 67 (24) 83 (20) .295 <.001
5. My own gender is of importance in other professional relations, for example with colleagues, medical staff or in research. 62 (177) 51 (43) 64 (76) 79 (41) .004 54 (107) 43 (29) 60 (50) 71 (20) .017 79 (70) 82 (14) 74 (26) 87 (21) .458 <.001
Summary variable:                 
"Importance-of-gender"-scale 63 (173) 51 (42) 67 (76) 76 (38) .008 56 (106) 45 (30) 61 (49) 69 (18) .046 78 (67) 75 (12) 79 (27) 83 (20) .873 .001
  1. p1 = p-values from chi-2 tests comparing specialty groups (2-sided, df = 2). p2 = p-values from chi-2 tests comparing men total, and women total (2-sided, df = 1)